Conference Information and Agenda

Conference in a Nutshell

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The Core Conference begins at:
8 AM on Tuesday, April 1, 2014 and continues through 5 PM on Thursday, April 3, 2014

Federal State and Local Agency Day is Friday, April 4, 2014

Trail Advocacy Day is Saturday, April 5, 2014

All Conference activities take place in Stonewall Jackson Lake State Park, WV.

The Indoor and Outdoor Trailbuilder Trade Show
Begins on Tuesday, April 1 at 2 pm, and continues through Thursday, April 3, at 2 pm.

Tony Image smIndoors, the Exhibit Area is located immediately outside of the concurrent session meeting rooms. This means all of the conference attendees will have the opportunity to pass through the booths many times a day, and visitors will also have the opportunity to hang out in the exhibit area, speak with the knowledgeable representatives, and network at all breaks and in between sessions throughout the day.

The Outdoor Trade Show and Demo Area allows unprecedented opportunity to try out the latest trailbuilding tools and technologies in a real world setting. The demo area is a disturbed area and is located within a 5 minute walk of the meeting rooms. We can do anything reasonable to the demo area as long as we put it back to some semblance of what is was when you arrived. Pretty cool, eh?
Exibitors will include bridges, trail building materials, professional contracting companies, outdoor retailers, and trailbuilding equipement manufacturers. Come prepared to have all of your detailed questions answered.  These are the best people in the country to answer your technical questions.

 

This year’s conference will be VERY HANDS-ON and workshop intensive.  Because of the diversity of sessions, mini-workshops and extended workshops in 2014, the PTBA Board has decided to offer an all-inclusive rate that can be purchased by the day that interests you most.  This means, you can pick and choose the days that would be most important for you to attend, and skip the days that are not of interest.  It is our hope that these opportunities will make our conference extremely responsive to the individual needs of trail industry leaders like yourself.

** This special PTBA Conference Package Registration includes:

  • Complete conference access to all concurrent sessions, mini-workshops, extended workshops, and the indoor/outdoor trade show 
  • All Meals and Continuous Refreshment Breaks for the day
  • Access to Stonewall Jackson Lake State Park and all of it’s amenities.
  • Full Wireless Internet
  • Free kayak, canoe, and bicycle rental.
  • Free Shuttles to/from local airports and throughout the State Park.

Here is a breakdown of the CONFERENCE PACKAGE rate per person per day:

$140/day (+tax) for Core Conference Days ($165 after March 14), and $125/day  (+tax) for Pre/Post Conference Days.  Breakdown of Core Conference costs includes:

  • $100 Conference Access ($125 after March 14)
  • $40/person Meals, Conference Access and Continuous Refreshment Breaks throughout the day.

Pre/Post Core Conference Days are discounted to $125/person/day (+tax) ($150 after March 14)

Lodging costs $90/night (+tax) and must be purchased through the PTBA website (do not call the Stonewall Resort to receive PTBA rates).

The core conference includes the Trailbuilders Trade Show with both indoor booths and outdoor equipment demonstration area where you can try out equipment in real soil. We expect around 300-350 conference attendees.

The heart of the core conference is made up of over 45 informative Concurrent Sessions and 14 Mini-Workshops (2.5 hours indoor and/or outdoor experiential) by experts in the field of trail construction, maintenance, monitoring, planning, design and management. Below is the most recent list of our confirmed sessions. Scroll down to browse the list of sessions and the draft agenda for the conference.  There are also 10 Extended Workshops (1-3 days) planned this year, which include:

The Tuesday Night Keynote is entitled:

Trail Innovation at the Rahall Transportation Institute
Speaker:  Robert H. “Bob” Plymale, Director and CEO, Rahall Transportation Institute [7pm-8pm]

headshot_plymaleRTI’s Trails team is actively enhancing and improving lands that provide recreational, aesthetic, alternate transportation and educational opportunities for motorized and non-motorized users.  As CEO and director of the Rahall Transportation Institute (RTI), Bob Plymale leads a dynamic team of business, academic and research professionals working to enhance safety and economic development opportunities through transportation. In addition to managing the day-to-day operations at RTI, Plymale is currently serving his fifth term in the WV State Senate, District 5. 

The Keynote Speaker at our Awards and Entertainment Program this year will be

DW COVERChristine Byl, Interior Trails

Byl headshotChristine Byl is a writer and a trail worker of 17 years. She worked on and led professional trail crews from 1996-2007 in Glacier National Park in NW Montana, Chugach National Forest in Cordova, AK, and Denali National Park in Interior Alaska. In 2008 she and her husband Gabe Travis started Interior Trails, a trail contracting business specializing in sustainable trail layout, design, construction, consulting and training for clients across Alaska. Dirt Work: An Education in the Woods, her first book, is about trail crews, tools, wild places, and labor. She lives, writes and works based on a few acres of tundra outside Healy, Alaska.

 

(All workshops are in development so their times, titles and dates are subject to change)

Pre-conference Workshops on March 30, 31, & April 1, 2014

Post-conference Workshops on April 4-5, 2014

You can register for any combination of conference days.  Each day includes access to the Trailbuilders Trade Show and all concurrent sessions, mini-workshops, and extended workshops that occur on that day.  It also includes all meals and refreshment breaks, and full access to all park and hotel amenities. You can register online by credit card or by mail with a check.

Here are a few things to remember as you prepare to register:

  1. Lodging MUST be purchased through the PTBA registration system, or you will not receive the PTBA discounts. Lodging costs $90/night (single or double occupancy)
  2. You will purchase your attendance at this year’s conference on a PER DAY basis, so be sure to check out the Conference Agenda to see which days you’d like to attend.
  3. Some of the Extended Workshops require extra staff, equipment and logistics, and therefore have one-time fees in addition to the Conference Package for each day of the workshop.
  4. If you will be joined by a spouse or guest that will not be attending the conference, you can register for the Conference Package for yourself and you will be prompted to add your spouse/guest for $60/night.  This will give your spouse/guest shared lodging and all meals on each day you choose (continental breakfast, continuous breaks, lunch and dinner).

button_register_online

Or, download a printable MAIL IN REGISTRATION FORM

The well-appointed conference facilities, Stonewall Jackson Lake State Park, WV, has over 208 rooms, lakeside cabins for larger groups, abundant free parking, trails and trail workshops immediately outside the doors of the conference center, and amazing food! 

 

 

Click HERE to sign up for email Conference Updates

Enter Shopping Cartor, download a printable MAIL IN REGISTRATION FORM

Topic Separator

Tentative Conference Agenda

(For workshops, see workshop schedule)

 (All concurrent sessions are subject to change)

 

2014ConfScheSunMon 2014ConfScheTues 2014ConfScheWed 2014ConfScheThurs 2014ConfScheFri 2014ConfScheSat

Topic Separator

Concurrent Session Descriptions and Speaker Bios

Tuesday April 1        2:00-3:00 pm     GENERAL SESSION

State of the Trial Building Industry  [Stonewall Ballroom]
Interactive discussion of the development of the Trail Industry Professionalism standards and a potential trail certification program.

Speaker: Troy Duffin, PTBA Board President and owner of Alpine Trails Inc.
Troy Duffin has been building exceptional trails for over 20 years. With almost 500 miles completed, he is credited with some of the most enjoyable, iconic trails in the nation, including four which have been used for IMBA “Epic” rides. In addition to construction, he has worked extensively on planning, design, and maintenance projects. He has vast experience not only in the private sector, but also in the non-profit sector, and as an agency trails manager. He has spoken at dozens of regional and national conferences on a wide range of topics, and has received numerous industry awards.

 

Tuesday April 1        3:00-3:30 pm     GENERAL SESSION

FHWA Recreation Trails Funding Update [Stonewall Ballroom]
Review of the status of the RTP program and other trail funding opportunities.

Speaker: Christopher Douwes, Recreation Trails Program Manager, FHWA
Speaker description

 

Tuesday April 1        3:45-5:30 pm     TRADE SHOW GRAND OPENING

Outdoor Trade Show Grand Opening [Outdoor Trade Show Area]
This time is specifically dedicated to our Indoor and Outdoor Trade Show. All attendees will have the chance to visit the Trade Show grounds, view vendor and member demonstrations, and get your hands nice and dirty prior to the evening’s meal at the Stillwater’s Restaurant.

Tuesday April 1        7:00-10:00 pm     OPENING KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Opening Keynote Address and World Famous Tuesday Night Party [Stonewall Ballroom]

headshot_plymaleMr. Robert Plymale, Executive Director of the Rahall Transportation Institute will address the cutting edge trail programs undertaken be RTI and promoted ambitiously by Representative Rahall in the Unites States Congress. Mr. Plymale will also read a letter to the conference attendees from Representative Rahall. RTI’s Trails team is actively enhancing and improving lands that provide recreational, aesthetic, alternate transportation and educational opportunities for motorized and non-motorized users. The keynote address will be followed by light hors d’ouvres and liquid refreshments, and ample time for networking, and a drawing for door prizes. (Sponsored by TBA)

Speaker: Robert H. “Bob” Plymale, Director and CEO, Rahall Transportation Institute
As CEO and director of the Rahall Transportation Institute (RTI), Bob Plymale leads a dynamic team of business, academic and research professionals working to enhance safety and economic development opportunities through transportation. In addition to managing the day-to-day operations at RTI, Plymale is currently serving his fifth term in the WV State Senate, District 5.

 

Wednesday April 2        8:00-9:15 am     CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Helical Pier Overview [Stonewall Ballroom, Level 2]
Why Helical Piers? We will explore the process for determining if helical piers can be used, effects on permitting, layout of a boardwalk using helical piers, and installation procedures. Framing, decking, railings, and observation platforms will also be discussed. This session is rated for all levels.

Speaker: Peter Jensen & Erin Amadon, Peter S Jensen and Associates LLC
Peter Jensen is the principal of Peter S. Jensen and Associates, LLC based out of Great Barrington, Massachusetts. He is a nationally recognized expert in the accessible trails industry. He served on the Regulatory Negotiation Committee of the US Access Board, and has been integral in the development of proposed Accessibility Guidelines for Trails and Outdoor Developed Areas. He is also a skilled instructor in the design, construction, planning and maintenance of natural surface trails that are both sustainable and as inherently accessible as an environment will allow.

Mountain Bike Flow Panel [Birch Room, Level 2]
Description TBA

Speaker: Jon Underwood, Happy Trails; Troy Duffin, Alpine Trails; Rich Edwards, IMBA 

Jon Underwood has been building trails in Alaska for five years, and has been a PTBA member for two years. He is having so much fun building trail that he is still astonished when it is occasionally profitable.

Troy Duffin has been building exceptional trails for over 20 years. With almost 500 miles completed, he is credited with some of the most enjoyable, iconic trails in the nation, including four which have been used for IMBA “Epic” rides. In addition to construction, he has worked extensively on planning, design, and maintenance projects. He has vast experience not only in the private sector, but also in the non-profit sector, and as an agency trails manager. He has spoken at dozens of regional and national conferences on a wide range of topics, and has received numerous industry awards.

Israel Bike Trail [Pecan Room, Level 1]
Israel Trail bike trail is a national project for the construction of a mountain bike trail along the entire State of Israel more than 1000 km. Started as an idea about eight years ago and today we have about 300 kilometers of trail open for the riders some singles and some dirt roads. Over the years we gather experience in construction of desert trails ,public participation and workung in sensitive areas in the wild landscape and archeology site I can presnt the project challenges and activities

Speaker: Hillel Sussman, Israel bike trail / israel nature authority
I am am Urban Planner by profession started my professional activities in a very known architects landscape office in Israel where I conducted many plans and including the Israel National Master Plan , in recent years I simultaneously deals with issues of sustainable transportation and the promotion of cycling in Israel I am a member of the National Planning Committee and planning institutions nationwide as the representative of Israel nature authority / green organizations. I am responsible for the bike Trails in the Natural areas managed by the Israel nature authority

Wednesday April 2        9:15-10:30 am     MINI-WORKSHOP & CONCURRENT SESSIONS 

Keys to Developing a Quality Trail Contract: Specification & Provision Mini-Workshop [Stonewall Ballroom, Level 2]
A well thought out and executed competitive market place for trail work will create our best trails at the lowest possible price. The initial critical piece of that process is writing a trail contract that describes for all parties what is required and what the finished product will be. This workshop will provide an overview of developing a quality trail contract that effectively utilizes trail development standards. Particular emphasis will be given to the critical role of clear, well-written, definitive Specifications and Contract Provisions. How to prepare good Specs and Provisions, and problems arising from poor ones, will be covered in depth. 

Speaker: Mike Shields, Technical Consultant; Gerry Wilbour, Northwest Trails
Mike Shields started working on trails in 1960 at Olympic National Park, in the days of axes, misery-whips, and 90-lb loads in a Trapper Nelson pack. In his NPS career he’s been a Crew Leader, Ranger, Roads Foreman, Maintenance Mechanic, Trails Foreman, and Facility Manager, but primarily and always a trailman, and has worked trails in Olympic, Big Bend, Canyonlands, Natural Bridges, North Cascades, Kings Canyon, Rocky Mountain and Denali. Two of those parks (Canyonlands, North Cascades) were brand new and he helped “invent” the trail systems in both. He became adept at timber felling, log and rock construction, mule packing, rigging, using explosives as a precision tool, and suspension bridge and tram design, and has been teaching the following since 1972: Trail design & layout, trail construction & maintenance, terrain dynamics, blasting safety, technical blasting & rock mechanics, rigging safety, abandoned explosives disposal, bridge design, crew management, and field contract administration. Since his retirement as Denali’s Chief of Maintenance in late 1996 he has been a small contractor providing training, trail layout, and technical consulting services from Alaska to West Texas and California to Colorado. In 2010 he received American Trails “State Trail Worker Award” (Alaska) for his efforts at training and mentoring younger folks.

Gerry has an extensive background in planning, designing, estimating and developing trails, bridges and greenways for local, state and federal governments, as well as private developers. He has received national & regional awards for his work and has a widespread reputation for innovative solutions in creating low-impact trails through wilderness and natural areas. In over forty years in the business he has served as project manager for several hundred projects while designing and drafting contracts for more than one hundred of them. He has managed or participated in numerous multidisciplinary project teams. Many of his projects have involved large budgets, challenging schedules, complex and remote structures, or other tricky design and construction issues. Since 1990, he has taught many training classes and workshop sessions on designing, contract drafting, managing, maintaining and building quality, sustainable trails and systems. From 2004 to 2007, he served as President of the Professional Trailbuilders Association, and he currently sits on the board.

Equestrian Trails 101 [Birch Room, Level 2]

Description TBA

Speaker: Susan Stormer, PhD, S&S Trails 
Dr. Susan Stormer completed her training in clinical psychology at the University of South Florida in 1998 with a focus on behavioral medicine, which evaluates the interaction of psychological principles with physical health behaviors. A life-long equestrian and hiker, Susan began mountain biking in 1995 and started working on trails as a volunteer very soon after that. She became a professional consultant and trail educator in 2003, and is now self-employed as a trail contractor based out of Austin, Texas.

Creating a sustainable mountain bike trail in a World Heritage Site [Pecan Room, Level 1]
The Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site (COH WHS), South Africa, is a UNESCO protected karst landscape aimed at the protection of fossil sites and the karst ecosystem. The World Heritage Site (WHS) covers an area of 52 000 hectares of privately owned farm land surrounded by ever encroaching urban development. Vehicular access to visitor centres (2), local game parks and tourism facilities within the WHS is provided via a network of 100 km of regional connector roads generally located within road reserves varying in width from 20 – 40 meters. Increased non tourism vehicular traffic, use by motorbikes, heavy delivery vehicles and excessive speeding were some of the unplanned consequences of this upgraded road system. Following traffic studies, a series of traffic calming measures such as raised traffic platforms, traffic circles and the introduction of cycle lanes to reduce the road surface for vehicle use was implemented. The substantial increase in the number of road cyclists from adjoining urban areas to these created cycle lanes were not anticipated. Conflict between property owners, cyclists and vehicle users soon became evident. The shortage of suitable and safe areas and paths/trails for recreational cycling is a major concern in South Africa. Cycling surveys undertaken within the WHS during October 2013 revealed that up to 15% of cyclists using the cycle lanes prefer to mountain bike but the lack of trails in the area is a major negative factor. The opportunity to use the existing wide road reserves and traffic calming infrastructure to create a safe and sustainable mountain bike trail system in the WHS in response to the above conflict and shortage of trails will be explored and reported on in this paper.

Speaker: Hein Pienaar, Deputy Director, Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site
In a career that spans more than 24 years in the public sector, Hein was employed as a Town and Regional Planner for a period of 14 years with the City of Johannesburg followed by a period of 7 years reviewing Environmental Impact Assessment reports with the Gauteng Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Environment. He is currently employed by the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site Management Authority as a Deputy Director responsible for the management of development and events. His experience covers a wide range of land use and development work with particular attention and focus on environmental management and sustainable development. Interest in mountain biking and trail design and construction and cycling advocacy is the result of 10 years of mountain bike riding locally with a visit to Scotland during 2012 to experience mountain biking in Scotland considered a highlight. He is responsible for the management and construction of the first IMBA standard mountain bike trail system within the provincial road reserve in South Africa.

Wednesday April 2        10:45 am-12:00 pm     CONCURRENT SESSIONS 

Universal Access Trails and Routes: All Routes Are Not Equal Panel [Birch Room, Level 2]
Description TBA

Speaker: Janet Zeller, USDA FS; Bill Botten, US Access Board; Larry Knutson, Penn Trails 
Janet Zeller is the National Accessibility Program Manager for the U.S. Forest Service.She is responsible for the development and implementation of the accessibility programs and policies across the 193 million acres of the National Forest System. She also represents the Forest Service working on accessibility issues with partners, organizations, States, and other federal agencies including with the U.S. Access Board and the Department of Justice. Janet instructs accessibility and universal design of programs and facilities at a wide range of training sessions nationally.

Paul Ambrose Trail for Health (PATH)   [Stonewall Ballroom, Level 2]
Description TBA

Speaker: Amanda Payne, Trails Program Manager, Rahall Transportation Institute
Bio TBA

Wednesday April 2        1:30-2:45 pm     CONCURRENT SESSIONS 

Rigging for Trail Work   [Stonewall Ballroom, Level 2]
This presentation will explore rigging equipment and it’s many applications in trail building. Via slides and narration, information regarding the safe use of rigging will be presented. Griphoist winches and specialty tools with be described. Applications from simple pulling/dragging situations to overhead systems hundreds of feet long will be illustrated.

Speaker: Lester Kenway, Trail Services LLC
Lester Kenway, Trail Services LLC, has been working with wire rope and rigging equipment for 43 years. Since 1993, he has supplied equipment, advice and instruction in the safe use of rigging tools throughout the United States via his company, Trail Services LLC based in Bangor, Maine. Lester has been involved in trails since 1971 through positions with the State of Maine, as an Appalachian Trail Volunteer, and as an independent contractor. He served as the Trail Supervisor at Baxter State Park for 22 years.

Affordable Equipment for Mechanical Trail Building and Maintenance in Prairie and Savannah  [Birch Room, Level 2]
For many ecosystem types, herbaceous vegetation management is the primary focus of trail maintenance. Presented are affordable general-purpose power equipment systems adapted to the grassland/savannah environment for building new trail, e.g. riding mower equipped with tread scalper. This construction and maintenance system makes use of herbicides applied to tread only and other adaptations of ATV power.

Speaker: Robert Nicholson, Trail Coordinator, Switchgrass Mountain Bike Trail (IMBA Epic)
Robert Nicholson, BS, MS, Ph D. Rangeland Ecology 30+ years of teaching and research in grassland management President of the Board of Directors of Kansas Trails Council KTC Trail Coordinator, Switchgrass Mountain Bike Trail, Wilson State Park, Kansas. Principle designer and manager leading to 2012 IMBA Epic designation for Switchgrass Mountain Bike Trail Active mountain biking enthusiast.

Sweep Turn Construction Techniques [Pecan Room, Level 1]
This session covers the structural geometry of sweep turns at various slope angles, and its effects on turn point selection, turn layout, construction, drainage, traffic flow and wear, and maintenance.

Speaker: Mike Shields, Technical Consultant; Gabe Travis, Interior Trails
Mike Shields started working on trails in 1960 at Olympic National Park, in the days of axes, misery-whips, and 90-lb loads in a Trapper Nelson pack. In his NPS career he’s been a Crew Leader, Ranger, Roads Foreman, Maintenance Mechanic, Trails Foreman, and Facility Manager, but primarily and always a trailman, and has worked trails in Olympic, Big Bend, Canyonlands, Natural Bridges, North Cascades, Kings Canyon, Rocky Mountain and Denali. Two of those parks (Canyonlands, North Cascades) were brand new and he helped “invent” the trail systems in both. He became adept at timber felling, log and rock construction, mule packing, rigging, using explosives as a precision tool, and suspension bridge and tram design, and has been teaching the following since 1972: Trail design & layout, trail construction & maintenance, terrain dynamics, blasting safety, technical blasting & rock mechanics, rigging safety, abandoned explosives disposal, bridge design, crew management, and field contract administration. Since his retirement as Denali’s Chief of Maintenance in late 1996 he has been a small contractor providing training, trail layout, and technical consulting services from Alaska to West Texas and California to Colorado. In 2010 he received American Trails “State Trail Worker Award” (Alaska) for his efforts at training and mentoring younger folks.

Wednesday April 2        3:00-4:15 pm     CONCURRENT SESSIONS 

Volunteers in Professional Construction (The Hybrid Model)  [Stonewall Ballroom, Level 2]

How do professionals and volunteers work together on highly technical trail projects without driving each other wild? This session will discuss the various strategies, and potential successes, and failures to this hybrid model of construction utilizing several case studies involving technical hybrid trail projects in New York State. Co-presented by PTBA member, Tahawus Trails LLC and the volunteers of the Jolly Rovers Trail Crew, this team of professionals and volunteers have worked together on numerous projects with great success. Topics to be covered will include: establishing the scope of work for volunteer involvement, recruitment and training requirements for volunteers on projects, and retention of volunteers throughout your project. All topics will be covered from both the professionals and volunteers perspective. In the end this session will leave you with a tool kit of volunteer strategies to tailor fit your technical project needs.

Speaker: Chris Ingui, Tahawus Trails
Bio TBA

Shared Use Path Guidelines   [Birch Room, Level 2]
This session reviews the background and current Access Board developed guidelines and technical provisions for newly built Shared-use Paths.

Speaker: Bill Botten, US Access Board
Bio TBA

 

Switchback Turn Construction Techniques  [Pecan Room, Level 1]
Learn methods covering the structural geometry of switchbacks at various slope angles, and its effects on turn point selection, turn layout, construction, drainage, traffic flow and wear, and maintenance.

Speaker: Mike Shields, Technical Consultant; Gabe Travis, Interior Trails
Mike Shields started working on trails in 1960 at Olympic National Park, in the days of axes, misery-whips, and 90-lb loads in a Trapper Nelson pack. In his NPS career he’s been a Crew Leader, Ranger, Roads Foreman, Maintenance Mechanic, Trails Foreman, and Facility Manager, but primarily and always a trailman, and has worked trails in Olympic, Big Bend, Canyonlands, Natural Bridges, North Cascades, Kings Canyon, Rocky Mountain and Denali. Two of those parks (Canyonlands, North Cascades) were brand new and he helped “invent” the trail systems in both. He became adept at timber felling, log and rock construction, mule packing, rigging, using explosives as a precision tool, and suspension bridge and tram design, and has been teaching the following since 1972: Trail design & layout, trail construction & maintenance, terrain dynamics, blasting safety, technical blasting & rock mechanics, rigging safety, abandoned explosives disposal, bridge design, crew management, and field contract administration. Since his retirement as Denali’s Chief of Maintenance in late 1996 he has been a small contractor providing training, trail layout, and technical consulting services from Alaska to West Texas and California to Colorado. In 2010 he received American Trails “State Trail Worker Award” (Alaska) for his efforts at training and mentoring younger folks.

Wednesday April 2        7:00-10:00 pm     AWARDS AND ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAM

Awards and Entertainment Program Address  [Stonewall Ballroom]
Byl headshotChristine Byl is a writer and a trail builder of 17 years. She worked on and led trail crews from 1996-2007 in Glacier National Park in NW Montana, Chugach National Forest in Cordova, AK, and Denali National Park in Interior Alaska. In 2008 she and her husband, Gabe Travis started Interior Trails, a trail contracting business specializing in sustainable trail layout, design, construction, consulting and training for clients across Alaska. Her first book, Dirt Work: An Education in the Woods, is about trail crews, tools, wilderness, and labor. She lives on a few acres of tundra north of Healy, Alaska, and spends as much time as possible traveling in wild places by foot, bike, ski, boat and dog.

DW COVERChristine’s recent book “Dirt Work,” was just named to a couple of year-end lists. Pretty exciting!

–10 Best NF Books of 2013 by Shelf Awareness  
–20 Great Books for the Trail, by Backpacker Magazine

 

 

Thursday April 3        8:00-9:15 am     CONCURRENT SESSIONS 

Stonework for Trails    [Stonewall Ballroom, Level 2]
This session will focus on the various stone structures which can be used in trail construction from steps, to drainage, to retaining. This session is rated for the beginner/intermediate level. Several experts will discuss the appropriate use for each structure and the type of materials suited for the installation.

Speaker: Eddie Walsh, Tahawus Trails; Erin Amadon, Peter S Jensen and Associates

Erin’s experiences with trail work began at a young age as a Vermont Youth Conservation Corps member in 1997. Since then she has been involved with various trail organizations and clubs in the northeast Erin brings 16 years of trail work knowledge and experience to volunteer groups, clients, and fellow trail lovers. As a founding member of Peter S. Jensen and Associates LLC, Erin generally stays busy working on technical trail projects and teaching trail skills, most recently working with SCA as a work skills instructor/lead instructor.

Eddie Walsh is the Manager and Principle of Tahawus Trails LLC. He has been building trails professionally since 1994 and has taught dozens of stone construction workshops.

Working primarily with the thin soils and rugged topography of the northeast has contributed to a wide variety of innovation with stone for both presenters.

Universal Access Trail Planning   [Birch Room, Level 2]
Description TBA

Speaker: Peter Jensen, Peter S Jensen and Associates LLC
Peter Jensen is the principal of Peter S. Jensen and Associates, LLC based out of Great Barrington, Massachusetts. He is a nationally recognized expert in the accessible trails industry. He served on the Regulatory Negotiation Committee of the US Access Board, and has been integral in the development of proposed Accessibility Guidelines for Trails and Outdoor Developed Areas. He is also a skilled instructor in the design, construction, planning and maintenance of natural surface trails that are both sustainable and as inherently accessible as an environment will allow.

Lands, Trails and the OPDMD Challenge   [Pecan Room, Level 1]
What the recent Department of Justice Rule on the use of Other Power Driven Mobility Devices requires and how it applies to existing Federal, State, local, and privately owned trails and lands open to the public. The assessment factors and public notice requirements under that Rule will also be addressed. Discussion will be encouraged.

Speaker: Janet Zeller, Accessibility Program Manager, US Forest Service; Larry Knutson, Penn Trails
Janet Zeller is the National Accessibility Program Manager for the U.S. Forest Service. She is responsible for the development and implementation of the accessibility programs and policies across the 193 million acres of the National Forest System. She also represents the Forest Service working on accessibility issues with partners, organizations, States, and other federal agencies including with the U.S. Access Board and the Department of Justice. Janet instructs accessibility and universal design of programs and facilities at a wide range of training sessions nationally.

Accommodating the Impacts of Climate Change in the Design of Winter Trails   [Summersville Room, Level 1]
According to Climate Scientist Daniel Scott, “Under certain warming forecasts, more than half of the 103 ski resorts in the Northeast will not be able to maintain a 100-day season by 2039.” This presentation focuses on tactics to mitigate the effects of climate change on human powered winter activities. Winter sport is an integral piece of many communities, tourist destinations, and competitive youth and elite programs in the Northern Hemisphere. Cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, and now snow biking have seen dramatic participant growth in recent years, and are value-added components of any location, whether it be a year-round trail network at a resort, a ski center, or a neighborhood or private residence. However, the increasing popularity of human-powered snow sports is set against the stark background of climate change and warming trends. Our winters are becoming gradually warmer and much more erratic. In this presentation we will tackle this issue head-on, and look at strategies ranging from canopy management to pre-emptive trail siting to snow-making.

Speakers:  John Morton & Noah Brautigam, Morton Trails

John Morton: I’ve had the amazing good fortune to have participated in seven Winter Olympic Games as an athlete, a coach, the U.S. Biathlon Team Leader, and most recently at Salt Lake, as Chief of Course for the Biathlon events. I’ve attended scores of National Championships, World Championships, Biathlon World Cup competitions, and the World University Games.I grew up in Walpole, NH, and skied four events (slalom, downhill, jumping and cross country) for Tilton School, in Tilton, NH. During four years on the Middlebury College ski team, my aptitude for cross country emerged, first as Eastern Intercollegiate Champion in 1966 and ‘68, then as runner up in the 1968 NCAA Championships. Following college, a four-year assignment to the U.S. Biathlon Training Center at Fort Richardson, Alaska was interrupted by a tour of duty in South Vietnam as a mobile advisory team leader. Upon release from active service in 1972, I taught high school English and coached running and skiing in Anchorage. In the autumn of 1978, I was named head coach of men’s skiing at Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. After eleven years coaching at Dartmouth, I gave up that position in 1989 to write Don’t Look Back, a comprehensive guide to cross-country ski racing, and to begin designing Nordic ski trails. During the past 18 years, I’ve developed trails for private landowners, municipalities and schools, resorts, as well as competition venues for major international events such as the World University Games and Biathlon World Cups. I have designed trails throughout northern New England, and in Wisconsin, Michigan, Utah, Colorado, Alaska and South Korea. In the spring of 2002, I was part of an international team of consultants asked to assist with the planning of the new Cairngorms National Park in the Scottish Highlands. Although I began designing trails for cross country skiing, I found that these trails soon became popular with mountain bikers, runners, horse-riders, and others. I found that there are common principles associated with fun, quality trails, and I have since worked on many types of trail projects beyond the initial interest in Nordic skiing. When not thrashing through the forest laying out trails, I write about sports for several publications, and serve as a commentator for Vermont Public Radio. In 1998, I wrote a novel, Medal of Honor, I still compete in cross country skiing and distance running. My family and I make our home at the end of a dirt road, surrounded by ski trails in Thetford, VT.

Noah Brautigam: Growing up at a small Vermont cross-country ski center served as the perfect introduction to ski racing and trail design and construction. From a young age I was exposed to the day-to-day operations of a ski center, and I have continued designing, cutting, grooming, and racing on ski trails since. After skiing at multiple Junior National events and racing for Green Mountain Valley School in Waitsfield, VT, I was lucky enough to attend Middlebury College. At Middlebury, I skied for another four years, and graduated with a degree in Geography and a focus in Geographic Information Systems and recreation mapping. During my senior year of college I collaborated with John Morton on the new homologated 5 kilometer race course at Rikert Touring Center in Ripton, VT – providing mapping support. This initial work sparked an interest in trail design that I would return to later. After graduating I moved to Truckee, California, where I worked as a GIS consultant at an environmental restoration company, assistant manager at Royal Gorge XC Ski Resort for the winter of 2012-2013, GIS Technician at the Truckee Donner Land Trust, and Junior Nordic ski coach. I also served as the course designer and Assistant Chief of Competition for the SuperTour Finals and Distance National Championships in Truckee, CA in Spring 2013. Most recently I have relocated to Salt Lake City, UT, where I coach the junior xc skiing program for the Park City Nordic Ski Club, and work extensively with Morton Trails. I continue to ski race occasionally, as well as race in long distance running events. I am passionate about skiing of all sorts, mountain biking, and trail running. I find the design of world-class trails as an exercise in connecting people with their landscape extremely rewarding.

 

Thursday April 3        9:15-10:30 am     CONCURRENT SESSIONS 

Alternate Lines: design, build, and maintain trails that serve a variety of users with differing abilities, motivations, and transport methods.    [Stonewall Ballroom, Level 2]
Narrowly focused, single use trails have their place, but in many situations creating a trail experience that serves a wider range of people is an advantage. This session will examine technical trail features for mountain bikers in depth, as well as exploring the wants and needs of various pedestrian, equestrian, and other users and how to create trail experiences that serve that wider variety of trail users.

Speaker: Valerie Naylor, Valerie Naylor Trails Specialist
Valerie Naylor brings a variety of skills to the Mechanized Trail Construction Workshop with over a dozen years in trail development experience. Her time as Trails Coordinator for FL Office of Greenways and Trails, employee of Trail Dynamics LLC, and most recently owner of Valerie Naylor, Trails Specialist has made her an expert in the nuances of mechanized trail work with thousands of hours on mini-skid steers and mini-excavators. Val has led or instructed a wide variety of trail related trainings aimed at agency staff, volunteers, PTBA members, and enthusiasts.

A Horse Is A Horse, Of Course: Planning for a Great Horse Trail   [Birch Room, Level 2]
Whether you are a seasoned hiker, mountain biker, horseback rider, trail manager or just enjoy being out in nature, this workshop may be for you. If you would like to be more effective while advocating for or managing shared use trails that include Equestrians, sign up for this one. We will be examining how to assess your trail and what attributes are beneficial to accommodate horse use while reducing user conflict, providing a more comfortable experience for all trail enthusiasts, and promoting open space.

Speakers:  Gwen and Bud Wills, PA Equine Council
Gwen and Bud Wills for most of their lives have enjoyed horses in various manners from showing to working cattle and packing in the west and trail riding. For over a decade they have dedicated themselves to educating equestrians, other trail users and land managers about trail stewardship, building sustainable trails as well as cooperation between all trail enthusiasts and public land managers in PA and at national trail conferences.

Universal Access Outdoor Recreation Access Route & Trailhead Planning   [Pecan Room, Level 1]
Description TBA

Speakers:  Bill Botten, US Access Board; Janet Zeller, Accessibility Program Manager, US Forest Service; Larry Knutson, Penn Trails
Janet Zeller is the National Accessibility Program Manager for the U.S. Forest Service. She is responsible for the development and implementation of the accessibility programs and policies across the 193 million acres of the National Forest System. She also represents the Forest Service working on accessibility issues with partners, organizations, States, and other federal agencies including with the U.S. Access Board and the Department of Justice. Janet instructs accessibility and universal design of programs and facilities at a wide range of training sessions nationally.

Safely & Effectively Mark Your Trails Using Safe Excavation Practices   [Summersville Room, Level 1]
This session will cover effective ways to mark your trails with a high regard for trail user safety, using high impact marking posts and signage. We’ll cover how to incorporate 911 into trail marking to help improve safety on the trail as well as the use of safe excavation practices when designing or remarking your trail system. From calling 811 before you dig to following the Common Ground Alliances best practices, safe excavation is key to keeping yourself, your trail users, and the environment safe.

Speaker: Scott Landes, Rhino Markings
Scott Landes has been actively involved in the marking and damage prevention industry since 1982. Mr. Landes is currently the President of Rhino Marking & Protection Systems & Infrastructure Resources. •Founded the CGA 811 Excavation Safety Conference & Expo •Founder of the Damage Prevention Professional Magazine & serves as the publisher •Created the annual Excavation Safety Guide (over 750,000 published in 2013) •Active Common Ground Alliance Education Committee member since 2004 & current co-chair •Received 2007 CGA Jim Barron Award •Contributing Editor, Underground Focus Magazine (Since 1990-2003) •Articles on Damage Prevention have also appeared in Underground Construction Magazine, Municipal Connection Magazine, PCCA Journal, Pipeline & Gas Journal, the APWA Reporter, Damage Prevention Professional, & the Excavation Safety Guide •Featured Speaker on damage prevention & many state, national, & international conferences, including Gas & Power Turkey, & No Dig South America

 

Thursday April 3        1:30-2:45 pm     CONCURRENT SESSIONS 

Planning for Success: Bike Parks and Destination Trail Systems   [Stonewall Ballroom, Level 2]
A primer on bike parks and destination trail systems with a focus on ensuring a future park is primed for success.

Speaker: Rich Edwards, IMBA Trail Solutions
Bio TBA

Tread Surface Materials for Trails  [Birch Room, Level 2]
Description TBA.

Speaker: Larry Knutson, Penn Trails
Bio TBA

Successful Stakeholder Management – Building partnerships and keeping them happy.  [Pecan Room, Level 1]
Stakeholders, when dealing with trail projects, are considered anyone who is directly or indirectly involved or has influence over a project. In all cases they have the ability to make a project run smoothly or stall a project entirely. For over 10 years now the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority has been working to improve their stakeholder engagement and management relating to trail planning and implementation, both from a strategic planning stand point through to in-ground construction. Obtaining the support of internal staff for natural and cultural heritage permits, as well as external user groups are necessary steps in a successful trail project. Successful stakeholder engagement is an excellent selling feature for any trail project, large or small, and is an important component of Land Management. It is an important aid in developing community stewardship, respect for Conservation Lands and the recreational opportunities they provide. With more people involved in trail projects come the challenge of managing stakeholders and their different opinions, desires and values as well as the opportunity to harness their motivation towards the project. This session will review the benefits of stakeholder engagement, explain how to effectively engage stakeholders, present how to successfully management stakeholder interests and provide communication templates for attendees to utilize within their organization.

Speaker: Michael Goodyear, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority
While working with the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, Michael Goodyear, has worked on developing a variety of trail networks in and around the Toronto area. He has worked from the ground up, starting with trail construction and maintenance to more recently completing property Master Plans. Michael draws on his education of Ecosystem Management, Environment Studies and Project Management to successfully plan and implement trail systems that balance the protection of important natural resources with a growing demand for public recreation opportunities. As an avid trail user he can regularly be seen on the trail running, cycling or taking a walk with his wife, daughter and dog.

Prepare to Launch: Guide to Water Trail Development  [Summersville Room, Level 1]
How do you get started in developing boat access sites for your Water Trail? What are some of the best design examples, based on the site location? Come view a presentation about the new 245-page workbook “Prepare to Launch! Guidelines for Assessing, Designing and Building Launch Sites for Carry-in Watercraft”. Share your own experiences, and ask questions. In addition, learn about the West Virginia and Pennsylvania State Water Trail designation process, with recent examples from the Upper Cheat River Water Trail (WV) and the Ohio River Water Trail – Pennsylvania Section. Each of the 3 topics will have a 15 minute presentation, using Powerpoint slides. We will have 30 minutes for Q/A and discussion.

Speaker:  Peggy Pings, NPS RTCA Program; Amanda Pitzer, Friends of the Cheat

Peggy Pings, Outdoor Recreation Planner, National Park Service – Rivers, Trails & Conservation Assistance Program. Since 1995, Peggy has been assisting communities and nonprofits start up their close-to-home outdoor recreation and conservation projects, such as land & water trails. Peggy has a Bachelor’s degree in Landscape Architecture and a Master’s degree in Recreation & Park Management. She lives in the Morgantown area, and her work region is WV and western PA. She also owns the Twin Spruce Marina, 2 miles south of Morgantown along the Monongahela River and the Mon River Rail-Trail.

Amanda Pitzer, Executive Director, Friends of the Cheat. Friends of the Cheat, a non-profit watershed group based out of Preston County, WV, has worked with private and public partners, including volunteer landowners, to develop and promote river access in the Cheat watershed for nearly 20 years. Recently the group expanded their focus from whitewater paddling access to include Class I and II waterways, and obtained official state water trail designation for the ~40 mile Upper Cheat River Water Trail in early 2013. Prior to joining Friends of the Cheat, Amanda was an environmental educator focused on connecting youth with nature for increased environmental literacy, stewardship, and civic engagement.

 

Thursday April 3        3:00-4:15 pm     CONCURRENT SESSIONS 

The Future of Bike Parks   [Stonewall Ballroom, Level 2]
Description TBA

Speaker: Jerome Pelland, Sentiers Boreal; Jake Carsten, S&S Trails
Bio TBA

Building Partnerships: The Intersection of Professionals, Conservation Corps, and Volunteers   [Birch Room, Level 2]
Explore a typical work day on a project with partnerships between professionals, conservation corps members, and volunteers. The Bear Mountain Trails Project has utilized these partnerships since breaking ground in 2006 to produce high quality sustainable trail. Learn helpful techniques to make these projects a success on the ground.

Speaker: Ama Koenigshof, Trail Builder/Educator, New York-New Jersey Trail Conference
Ama Koenigshof, Trail Builder/ Educator with New York-New Jersey Trail Conference Originally from Michigan, Ama has degree in Non Profit Administration and has maintained, built, and led trail crews for non profits in fourteen different states across the US. She currently manages the Bear Mountain Trails Project, is dean of NYNJTC’s Trail University, and supports NYNJTC’s 1,300 volunteers through consultation, trail design, and skills workshops.

Bridge Building 101 [Pecan Room, Level 1]
Introduction to the basic types of trail and pedestrian bridges by Tri-State Company, Inc. Includes discussion of the basic considerations of bridge design. Descussion of site selection, the “physics of bridge functioning”, dead load, live load, and moment of load. The presentation includes photos, drawings, and animations. This presentation was one of the highlights of the 2010 West Virginia State Trails Conference.

Speaker: Charlie Dundas, Tri-State Company Inc.
Charles Dundas…”Charlie” began building trail, as a volunteer in 1958, while a Boy Scout. His company, Tri-State Company, has been building trail, professionally, since 1987. Tri-State’s market niche is remote site construction, often employing helicopter support. In the course of 24 years, they have built, designed, reconstructed or maintained over 500 miles of trail. They are, perhaps, better known as the “bridge people”, having built numerous bridges to include: cable suspension, glu-lam, steel, heavy timber, and their specialty, unique curvilinear screw laminated bridges/elevated walkways. Charlie views his company as more than a trail building company, he sees it as engaged in the art of “recreational infrastructure”.

 

The Infinite and Ultimate Resource for Trail Inventory and Data Collection [Summersville Room, Level 1]
A look at digital data dictionaries and their application in trail inventories and condition surveys using GPS instruments.  An interactive session on what is needed to do a digital trail inventory or creating a digital data dictionary for trail maintenance, or just about anything.

Speaker: Don Hays, Donald Hays Trail Contractor Inc.
Don Hays, Vice President of Donald Hays Trail Contractor, Inc. has been building trails sincethe early 1960’s as a volunteer. He then founded a trail building business, Donald Hays Trail Contractor, starting in 1987 and has since built trails all over the world. In 1988 DHTC, joined Professional Trailbuilders Association. Don has held the positions of President, Vice President, Treasurer and currently on the Board of Directors of PTBA since 1996. In the year 1999 he started a division of his trail building business providing trail inventory and condition surveys. Since then DHTC, Inc. has worked with the Province of Camarines Sur, Luzon, Philippines; province wide eco-tourism master plan, San Diego County; 400 miles of trail inventory, Sacrament Municipal Utilities Dist; Recreation Master Plan at Loon Lake, the City of Santa Fe, NM; recreation master plan, La Tierra Trails and many USDA Forest Service and many county park trail inventories. In 2003 the company was incorporated as a woman owned business.

Friday April 4        8:00-9:15 am     CONCURRENT SESSIONS 

Helicopter Operation in Trail Construction and Remote Site Support   [Birch Room, Level 2]
Case studies of four differing helicopter operations by Tri-State Company, Inc. Includes dicussions of the rationale for selection of helicopter support, cost, capibilities, support requirements, considerations for material handling , safety, and operational efficiency. This presentation will includes photos and movies of four sperate operations. [Little Stoney Creek Bridge, Cascades NRT bridges, Apple Orchard Falls, and High Knob Bridge

Speakers:  Charlie Dundas, Tri-State Company
Charles Dundas..."Charlie" began building trail, as a volunteer in 1958, while a Boy Scout. His company, Tri-State Company, has been building trail, professionally, since 1987. Tri-State's market niche is remote site construction, often employing helicopter support. In the course of 24 years, they have built, designed, reconstructed or maintained over 500 miles of trail. They are, perhaps, better known as the "bridge people", having built numerous bridges to include: cable suspension, glu-lam, steel, heavy timber, and their specialty, unique curvilinear screw laminated bridges/elevated walkways. Charlie views his company as more than a trail building company, he sees it as engaged in the art of "recreational infrastructure".

 

A Horse Is A Horse, Of Course: Planning for a Great Horse Trail   [Pecan Room, Level 1]
Whether you are a seasoned hiker, mountain biker, horseback rider, trail manager or just enjoy being out in nature, this workshop may be for you. If you would like to be more effective while advocating for or managing shared use trails that include Equestrians, sign up for this one. We will be examining how to assess your trail and what attributes are beneficial to accommodate horse use while reducing user conflict, providing a more comfortable experience for all trail enthusiasts, and promoting open space.

Speakers:  Gwen and Bud Wills, PA Equine Council
Gwen and Bud Wills for most of their lives have enjoyed horses in various manners from showing to working cattle and packing in the west and trail riding. For over a decade they have dedicated themselves to educating equestrians, other trail users and land managers about trail stewardship, building sustainable trails as well as cooperation between all trail enthusiasts and public land managers in PA and at national trail conferences.

Friday April 4        9:15-10:30 am     CONCURRENT SESSIONS 

Bridge Building 103    [Birch Room, Level 2]
Case studies of the construction of four differing trail bridge designs, detailing the the thought behind the selection of the type of bridge, the process, material, and critical path of construction. Also included are display of the elements of construction control used by Tri-State Company, Inc. [Nikon Total Station EDM, Trimble Recon Construction Computer, and Nikon Auto level as well as older style of transit levels and measuring tools]. This presentation will focus on the following types of bridges: Cable suspension, glu-lam beam, prefabricated steel, and curvilinear screw-lam bridges.

Speaker: Charlie Dundas, Tri-State Company
Charles Dundas…”Charlie” began building trail, as a volunteer in 1958, while a Boy Scout. His company, Tri-State Company, has been building trail, professionally, since 1987. Tri-State’s market niche is remote site construction, often employing helicopter support. In the course of 24 years, they have built, designed, reconstructed or maintained over 500 miles of trail. They are, perhaps, better known as the “bridge people”, having built numerous bridges to include: cable suspension, glu-lam, steel, heavy timber, and their specialty, unique curvilinear screw laminated bridges/elevated walkways. Charlie views his company as more than a trail building company, he sees it as engaged in the art of “recreational infrastructure”.

Lands, Trails and the OPDMD Challenge   [Pecan Room, Level 1]
What the recent Department of Justice Rule on the use of Other Power Driven Mobility Devices requires and how it applies to existing Federal, State, local, and privately owned trails and lands open to the public. The assessment factors and public notice requirements under that Rule will also be addressed. Discussion will be encouraged.

Speaker: Janet Zeller, Accessibility Program Manager, US Forest Service; Larry Knutson, Penn Trails
Janet Zeller is the National Accessibility Program Manager for the U.S. Forest Service. She is responsible for the development and implementation of the accessibility programs and policies across the 193 million acres of the National Forest System. She also represents the Forest Service working on accessibility issues with partners, organizations, States, and other federal agencies including with the U.S. Access Board and the Department of Justice. Janet instructs accessibility and universal design of programs and facilities at a wide range of training sessions nationally.

Friday April 4        10:45-12:00 pm     CONCURRENT SESSIONS 

Successful Stakeholder Management – Building partnerships and keeping them happy.  [Birch Room, Level 2]
Stakeholders, when dealing with trail projects, are considered anyone who is directly or indirectly involved or has influence over a project. In all cases they have the ability to make a project run smoothly or stall a project entirely. For over 10 years now the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority has been working to improve their stakeholder engagement and management relating to trail planning and implementation, both from a strategic planning stand point through to in-ground construction. Obtaining the support of internal staff for natural and cultural heritage permits, as well as external user groups are necessary steps in a successful trail project. Successful stakeholder engagement is an excellent selling feature for any trail project, large or small, and is an important component of Land Management. It is an important aid in developing community stewardship, respect for Conservation Lands and the recreational opportunities they provide. With more people involved in trail projects come the challenge of managing stakeholders and their different opinions, desires and values as well as the opportunity to harness their motivation towards the project. This session will review the benefits of stakeholder engagement, explain how to effectively engage stakeholders, present how to successfully management stakeholder interests and provide communication templates for attendees to utilize within their organization.

Speaker: Michael Goodyear, Toronto and Region Conservation Authority
While working with the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, Michael Goodyear, has worked on developing a variety of trail networks in and around the Toronto area. He has worked from the ground up, starting with trail construction and maintenance to more recently completing property Master Plans. Michael draws on his education of Ecosystem Management, Environment Studies and Project Management to successfully plan and implement trail systems that balance the protection of important natural resources with a growing demand for public recreation opportunities. As an avid trail user he can regularly be seen on the trail running, cycling or taking a walk with his wife, daughter and dog.

 

Water Trails 101   [Pecan Room, Level 1]
This presentation will explore general concepts in Water Trail development, design, and management. The Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT) will be used as an example to explain the river and portage qualities needed to have a good foundation for a Water Trail. We will also discuss the many players and the roles they have in the creation of a water trail. Design elements will focus on signage needs, developing safe and effective transitions in the dynamic zone where the water meets the land as well as general campsite infrastructure. This will dovetail into sustainably managing the corridor where we will explain the system the NFCT uses to monitor and maintain the 740-mile recreation corridor.

Speakers:
Walter Opuszynski-NFCT Trail Director
Walter Opuszynski has been building, designing, and managing trails throughout New England and the Northern Forest for 15 years. He was educated at Unity College in Maine, receiving a background in the areas of education, land management and the natural sciences. For the past five years he has been the Trail Director for the Northern Forest Canoe Trail, a 740 mile waterway connecting Old Forge, NY and Fort Kent, ME. Focusing on stewardship efforts he has been working to develop a management system for the corridor that will accommodate sustainable use and retain the natural character the waterways and portages are known for while accommodating the diverse landownership and fostering the integration with trail communities.

Sam Brakeley-NFCT Regional Field Coordinator (NH, ME)
Sam is from North Andover, MA and a 2010 Colby College graduate where he majored in Environmental Studies. A life-long trails enthusiast he is an avid hiker, paddler, and skier who has thru-hiked the Long Trail in Vermont and the Appalachian Trail as well as thru-paddled the Northern Forest Canoe Trail. He continues to spend as much time in the woods and on the water as possible. He currently resides in Norwich, VT where he works for the Northern Forest Canoe Trail organization as Regional Field Coordinator, manages his own trail business, Hermit Woods Trailbuilders LLC, and is in the midst of planning his next adventure.

Noah Pollock-NFCT Regional Field Coordinator (VT-QC-ME)
Noah hails from Delmar, New York and graduated from Cornell University in 2003 with a Bachelor of Science in Natural Resources. In 2007 he earned a Master’s degree from the Rubenstein School for Environment and Natural Resources at the University of Vermont, where he studied sustainable community development and ecological economics. His thesis examined the economic impact of paddler tourism and recreation along the waterways that make up the Northern Forest Canoe Trail. Noah was one of the NFCT’s first interns in 2007; a Field Coordinator for several summers, assisting with intern and waterway work trip programs; and a Community Outreach consultant building relationships with business partners in Vermont. An avid paddler and river enthusiast, Noah also assists with the Vermont River Conservancy’s conservation and river access projects, particularly the Connecticut River Paddlers Trail.

  

Friday April 4        1:30-3:00 pm     CONCURRENT SESSIONS 

Hatfield-McCoy Trail System   [Birch Room, Level 2]
Description TBA

Speaker: Jeffrey Lusk, Hatfield-McCoy OHV Trail System
Bio TBA

Private Contracting in the 21st Century  [Pecan Room, Level 1]
This session will provide some tips on how to create concise, enforceable contracts, to assure all parties have a clear understanding of payment expectations and timing. In addition, we’ll cover contract terms which will help the contractor collect from the client if full, prompt payment is not made. We will also discuss how to include specific terms which will help insure payment, and specific legal options to go after a deadbeat client.

Speaker: Troy Duffin, Alpine Trails
Troy Duffin has been building exceptional trails for over 20 years. With almost 500 miles completed, he is credited with some of the most enjoyable, iconic trails in the nation, including four which have been used for IMBA “Epic” rides. In addition to construction, he has worked extensively on planning, design, and maintenance projects. He has vast experience not only in the private sector, but also in the non-profit sector, and as an agency trails manager. He has spoken at dozens of regional and national conferences on a wide range of topics, and has received numerous industry awards.

Friday April 4        3:30-5:00 pm     CONCURRENT SESSIONS 

Rail-trails: Backbones of Sustainable Trail Systems   [Birch Room, Level 2]
The rail-trail movement continues to grow across the country as more communities are eager to gain from the economic, health, transportation and environmental benefits these trails provide. Rail-trails exist in all 50 states and more than 21,000 miles of rail-trails traverse the U.S. Often, rail-trails act as connecting corridors and the “spine” of community or regional trail systems. This session will provide an overview of rail-trail acquisition and development, using case studies from Rails-to-Trails Conservancy’s (RTC) 26 years of experience to illustrate the role that rail-trails can play in a sustainable trail system. The rail-trail perspective on maintenance and management will also be discussed, with a sneak peak of findings from a comprehensive trail maintenance study that will be released by RTC in summer 2014. Successful strategies for rail-with-trail development (trails within or immediately adjacent to active railroad corridors) will be included to demonstrate how communities are safely incorporating these innovative projects into the larger fabric of transportation and recreation corridors.

Speaker:  Kelly Pack, Director of Trail Development, and Jim Brown, Manager of Trail Development, Rails-to-Trails Conservancy
Pack joined RTC in 2006 and currently directs technical assistance delivery and manages place-based project work in Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern states. In this capacity, she facilitates regional greenway planning initiatives, delivers training workshops, coordinates trail development strategy sessions with local, state, and federal stakeholders, generates trail assessments and feasibility studies, and performs GIS analysis for trail projects. Her community organizing and development experience includes work with local watershed organizations, trail and greenway planning initiatives, youth-oriented programs, pedestrian and bicycle advocacy groups, and a regional brownfield redevelopment center. She received her BA in English and MS in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Resources from West Virginia University.

Trail Professionalism   [Pecan Room, Level 1]
The private trail contracting industry is expanding, and not everyone is playing fair. This session is based on general concepts of licensing, insurance, and other legal requirements which should or must be followed by legitimate contractors. We’ll build on this foundation and explore deeper issues of proper and fair competition, when and how some contractors “go too far,” and what recourse might be available if you’re the victim of unfair competition.

Speaker: Troy Duffin, PTBA President and owner of Alpine Trails Inc.
Troy Duffin has been building exceptional trails for over 20 years. With almost 500 miles completed, he is credited with some of the most enjoyable, iconic trails in the nation, including four which have been used for IMBA “Epic” rides. In addition to construction, he has worked extensively on planning, design, and maintenance projects. He has vast experience not only in the private sector, but also in the non-profit sector, and as an agency trails manager. He has spoken at dozens of regional and national conferences on a wide range of topics, and has received numerous industry awards.

 

 

Saturday, April 5, 2014        CONCURRENT SESSIONS AND WORKSHOPS

Helical Pier Overview [Stonewall Ballroom, Level 2]
Why Helical Piers? We will explore the process for determining if helical piers can be used, effects on permitting, layout of a boardwalk using helical piers, and installation procedures. Framing, decking, railings, and observation platforms will also be discussed. This session is rated for all levels.

Speaker: Peter Jensen & Erin Amadon, Peter S Jensen and Associates LLC
Peter Jensen is the principal of Peter S. Jensen and Associates, LLC based out of Great Barrington, Massachusetts. He is a nationally recognized expert in the accessible trails industry. He served on the Regulatory Negotiation Committee of the US Access Board, and has been integral in the development of proposed Accessibility Guidelines for Trails and Outdoor Developed Areas. He is also a skilled instructor in the design, construction, planning and maintenance of natural surface trails that are both sustainable and as inherently accessible as an environment will allow.