2013 Conference Proceedings

Below is the list of Concurrent Sessions, the associated speaker bios, and a link to the session presentations, handouts or further information.  Please use this information for educational purposes only, and do not distribute or copy the information in these presentation without the consent of the presenters.  For contact information for the presenters, please see the 2013AttendeePublic-Final (pdf).

 

2013 Concurrent Sessions

Tuesday February 12        1:15-2:15 pm     GENERAL SESSION

World Premier of “The Trailbuilder”  (Film Trailer)
“The Trailbuilders” is a 30 minute documentary filmed in 2012 by PTBA Member Timber & Stone, LLC in partnership with Tamarack Media of Burlington, VT. The film brings you to three large scale trail construction projects located throughout Northeastern US. It provides a unique look into the world of professional trailbuilding, where creative construction yields sustainable trails for public use. “The Trailbuilders” captures moments of volunteer involvement, professional collaborations, and crew camaraderie. For anyone who has enjoyed a walk in the woods, this film tells the story behind the trail underfoot.

Speaker: Josh Ryan, Timber & Stone LLC
Josh Ryan is the owner and manager of Timber & Stone, LLC, a trail design and construction business based in Woodbury, VT. Timber & Stone, LLC offers trail design, construction expertise, and education workshops to land managers who seek a sustainable approach to trail construction.

 

Tuesday February 12        2:15-2:45 pm     GENERAL SESSION

2013 Funding Opportunities and RTP Update  (TAP Presentation PDF)
An update on public and private funding through the Federal Highway Administration’s RTP program and other sources.

Speaker: Christopher Douwes, RTP Program Manager

 

Tuesday February 12        3:00-4:15 pm     GENERAL SESSION KEYNOTE

Trails and Wellness – A Healthy Experience for People and the Environment (Presentation PDF)
Americans want to recreate on a more regular basis and closer to home. This is healthy for both people and the environment. The proposed federal trail accessibility guidelines will provide more recreation opportunities for more people while providing greater protection for trail environments. Janet will cover where, when and how these guidelines apply and how the guidelines can maximize accessibility and sustainability while protecting the unique characteristics of the natural settings.

Speaker:  Janet Zeller, National Accessibility Program Manager, USFS
She is responsible for the development and implementation of the accessibility programs and policies across the 193 million acres of the National Forest System. She also represents the Forest Service working on accessibility issues with partners, organizations, States, and other federal agencies including with the U.S. Access Board and the Department of Justice. Janet instructs accessibility and universal design of programs and facilities at a wide range of training sessions nationally.  Email= jzeller@fs.fed.us

 

Tuesday February 12       4:30-5:45 pm

Introduction to Sustainable Trails
(View Presentation IntroToSustainableTrails.pdf)
This course was developed for presentation at the 2007 West Virginia State Trail Conference at the behest of the West Virginia Department of Transportation, Division of highways, specifically the State Trails Co-ordinator.  This course was presented at numerous venues, to include State Parks, hiking clubs, and to groups receiving RTP funding.  This course is primarily directed toward the novice trail builder, but will also provide information, concepts, and considerations, that may be new to even the most experienced trail builders.  It will identify the main factor causing non-sustainability in trails. The course has five parts to it: the first addresses sustainability issues; the second deals with technical design solutions, design standards, and common sense approaches; the third is called, “Things Take Time”= TTT  or ( T ³ ), and deals with time and time management of volunteer labor and the efficiency of mechanized versus manual labor in maintaining trails; part four deals with bridges as solutions to certain sustainability issues, and part five presents five incredibly difficult real world sustainability challenges and the X-treme solutions that were employed to deal with them. This last part is titled, “Ooooooohhhhhhh and Aaaaaahhhhh!”.

Speaker(s): Charles Dundas, Tri-State Company
“Charlie”” began building trail, as a volunteer in 1958, while a Boy Scout. His company, Tri-State Company, has been building trail, professionally, since 1987. Tri-State’s market niche is remote site construction, often employing helicopter support. In the course of 24 years, they have built, designed, reconstructed or maintained over 500 miles of trail. They are, perhaps, better known as the “”bridge people””, having built numerous bridges to include: cable suspension, glu-lam, steel, heavy timber, and their specialty, unique curvilinear screw laminated bridges/elevated walkways. Charlie views his company as more than a trail building company, he sees it as engaged in the art of “recreational infrastructure”.

 

Turns for the Better
Learn how to design and lay out a perfect direction-reversing Sweep Turn or Switchback on various side slopes.  Explore how to use ordinary tools to create a geometrically precise layout, minimize construction time, and connect the approaches at the proper grade.  Gain an understanding of the effects of different slope angles on layout, construction, traffic wear, drainage and maintenance.

Speaker:  Mike Shields, NPS (retired)
Mike Shields started working on trails in 1960 at Olympic National Park, in the days of axes, misery-whips, and 90-lb loads in a Trapper Nelson pack. In his NPS career he’s been a Crew Leader, Ranger, Roads Foreman, Maintenance Mechanic, Trails Foreman, and Facility Manager, but primarily and always a trailman, and has worked trails in Big Bend, Canyonlands, Natural Bridges, North Cascades, Kings Canyon, Rocky Mountain and Denali. Two of those parks (Canyonlands, North Cascades) were brand new and he helped “invent” the trail systems in both. He became adept at timber felling, log and rock construction, mule packing, rigging, using explosives as a precision tool, and suspension bridge and tram design, and has been teaching the following since 1972: Trail design & layout, trail construction & maintenance, terrain dynamics, blasting safety, technical blasting & rock mechanics, rigging safety, abandoned explosives disposal, bridge design, crew management, and field contract administration. Since his retirement as Denali’s Chief of Maintenance in 1996 he has been a small contractor providing training, trail layout, and technical consulting services from Alaska to West Texas and California to Colorado. In 2010 he received American Trails “State Trail Worker Award” (Alaska) for his efforts at training younger folks.

 

Accessible Trail Design
With the upcoming release of the Federal Trail Accessibility Guidelines, trail builders, park administrators, land trusts, government officials and many others need to know how to build hiking trails that are sustainable and that provide access for everyone. This important session will help you understand the guidelines and will provide an overview of the techniques and skills needed to build sustainable hiking trails that provide enjoyment for all. Whether you work with an existing trail or are contemplating a new trail, this session is for you!

Speaker(s): Peter Jensen, Peter S. Jensen and Associates
Peter Jensen is the principal of Peter S. Jensen and Associates, LLC based out of Great Barrington, Massachusetts. He is a nationally recognized expert in the accessible trails industry. He served on the Regulatory Negotiation Committee of the US Access Board, and has been integral in the development of proposed Accessibility Guidelines for Trails and Outdoor Developed Areas. He is also a skilled instructor in the design, construction, planning and maintenance of natural surface trails that are both sustainable and as inherently accessible as an environment will allow.

Equestrian Trails – A Good Ride
Description:  TBA

Speakers:  Oscar Simpson and Eldon Reyer, Backcountry Horsemen of America

Oscar Simpson – Regional Director Backcountry Horseman, Representative Backcountry Horseman of America (BCHA) Washington DC.  Oscar has been involved in outdoor related activities and organizations his entire life. He has served on numerous committees and councils concerned with outdoor recreational activities and public access. In his present role he serves as the interface between equestrian trail users, federal and state agencies, congressional offices, and with other equestrian coalitions and conservation organizations.

Eldon Reyer – Backcountry Horseman – and – National Park Service ( Retired).  Eldon retired from the National Park Service in 1989 as the Associate Regional Director for Planning and Resource Management of the Southwest Region. He began his Park Ranger career in Yellowstone National Park as a Fire Guard, Mule Packer, Smoke Jumper, and Backcountry Horse Patrol Ranger. His assignments included Big Bend NP, Carlsbad Caverns NP, Grand Canyon NP, Canyonlands NP, Mount McKinley NP, Glen Canyon NRA, Superintendent of Custer Battlefield NM, Washington DC Office of Legislation and Associate Regional Director SWRO. His long time involvement in planning and resource management lead him to become a trail advocate in retirement. He has served on the Santa Fe County Open Land and Trails Planning and Advisory Committee, New Mexico Recreational Trails Advisory Board (RTP), Northern New Mexico Horseman’s Association, Backcountry Horseman Santa Fe Chapter and New Mexico Horse Council. In 2008 Eldon was recognized by the American Horse Council as “Horseman Of The Year” for his long time trail advocacy. He continues to provide clinics and workshops on “Handling stock in the Backcountry.”

 

Wednesday February 13       9:00-10:15 am

Bridge Building 101
(View Presentation - BRIDGES101.pdf )
Introduction to the basic types of trail and pedestrian bridges by Tri-State Company, Inc. Includes discussion of the basic considerations of bridge design. Discussion of site selection, the “physics of bridge functioning”, dead load, live load, and moment of load. The presentation includes photos, drawings, and animations. This presentation was one of the highlights of the 2010 West Virginia State Trails Conference.

Speaker(s): Charles Dundas, Tri-State Company
“Charlie” began building trail, as a volunteer in 1958, while a Boy Scout. His company, Tri-State Company, has been building trail, professionally, since 1987. Tri-State’s market niche is remote site construction, often employing helicopter support. In the course of 24 years, they have built, designed, reconstructed or maintained over 500 miles of trail. They are, perhaps, better known as the “bridge people”, having built numerous bridges to include: cable suspension, glu-lam, steel, heavy timber, and their specialty, unique curvilinear screw laminated bridges/elevated walkways. Charlie views his company as more than a trail building company, he sees it as engaged in the art of “recreational infrastructure”.

Risk Management for Trails and Bike Parks
Unfortunately, trail related lawsuits are on the rise. This session is an introduction to risk management for trails and will help attendees gain a better understanding of liability. Basic risk management strategy will be shared, and we will also use the audience as “jurors” in looking at photos of trail issues. Real case histories will help to shed some light on what types of lawsuits are happening and what the outcome of these cases.

Speaker:  Woody Keen, Trail Wisdom LLC
Woody Keen is President of Trail Wisdom LLC and he has served as President of Professional TrailBuilders Association since from 2006-2011. Woody is well known for “big picture” planning work and he has authored numerous trail management plans for a wide range of different land managing agencies.

 

Turns for the Better
Learn how to design and lay out a perfect direction-reversing Sweep Turn or Switchback on various side slopes.  Explore how to use ordinary tools to create a geometrically precise layout, minimize construction time, and connect the approaches at the proper grade.  Gain an understanding of the effects of different slope angles on layout, construction, traffic wear, drainage and maintenance.

Speaker:  Mike Shields, NPS (retired)
Mike Shields started working on trails in 1960 at Olympic National Park, in the days of axes, misery-whips, and 90-lb loads in a Trapper Nelson pack. In his NPS career he’s been a Crew Leader, Ranger, Roads Foreman, Maintenance Mechanic, Trails Foreman, and Facility Manager, but primarily and always a trailman, and has worked trails in Big Bend, Canyonlands, Natural Bridges, North Cascades, Kings Canyon, Rocky Mountain and Denali. Two of those parks (Canyonlands, North Cascades) were brand new and he helped “invent” the trail systems in both. He became adept at timber felling, log and rock construction, mule packing, rigging, using explosives as a precision tool, and suspension bridge and tram design, and has been teaching the following since 1972: Trail design & layout, trail construction & maintenance, terrain dynamics, blasting safety, technical blasting & rock mechanics, rigging safety, abandoned explosives disposal, bridge design, crew management, and field contract administration. Since his retirement as Denali’s Chief of Maintenance in 1996 he has been a small contractor providing training, trail layout, and technical consulting services from Alaska to West Texas and California to Colorado. In 2010 he received American Trails “State Trail Worker Award” (Alaska) for his efforts at training younger folks.

 

Trail Professionalism and Ethics
(View Presentation - Professionalism.pdf )

The private trail contracting industry is expanding, and not everyone is playing fair. This session is based on general concepts of licensing, insurance, and other legal requirements which should or must be followed by legitimate contractors. We’ll build on this foundation and explore deeper issues of proper and fair competition, when and how some contractors “go too far,” and what recourse might be available if you’re the victim of unfair competition.

Speakers:  Troy Duffin, Alpine Trails Inc.
Troy Duffin has been building exceptional trails for 17 years. With almost 400 miles completed, he is credited with some of the most enjoyable, iconic trails in the nation, including two which have been used for IMBA “Epic” rides. In addition to construction, he has worked extensively on planning, design, and maintenance projects. He has vast experience not only in the private sector, but also in the non-profit sector, and as an agency trails manager. He has spoken at dozens of regional and national conferences on a wide range of topics, and has received numerous industry awards.

 

Wednesday February 13       10:45 am-12:00 pm

Equestrian Trails – A Washington DC Perspective
Description

Speaker: Oscar Simpson, Backcountry Horsemen of America

Oscar Simpson – Regional Director Backcountry Horseman, Representative Backcountry Horseman of America (BCHA) Washington DC.  Oscar has been involved in outdoor related activities and organizations his entire life. He has served on numerous committees and councils concerned with outdoor recreational activities and public access. In his present role he serves as the interface between equestrian trail users, federal and state agencies, congressional offices, and with other equestrian coalitions and conservation organizations.

Modern Geotechnical Solutions for Trails
Professional Trailbuilders are often called on to create sustainable trails through challenging terrain. Traditional methods and practices often have limitations in these environments. Modern Geotechnical engineering and design has developed a number of interesting and effective designs, systems and solutions for difficult soils with poor load bearing capacity and or anchoring such as wetlands. In other areas the broader geotecnical industry has also developed solutions for anchoring to steep slopes, retaining walls and fill retention. Trailbuilders have adapted some of these solutions to challenging remote environments.

Speaker:  Gerry Wilbour, Northwest Trails

 

GPS/GIS Applications in Trailbuilding
Due to easy truck access and the steep and wild terrain of Iron Mountain, the city of Merritt, British Columbia, has become an attractive location for resident and visiting cyclists to ride, build, and explore. Easy access, however, has lead to an extensive network of unregulated trails and technical trail features (TTFs) that have exploded in volume over the last four years. Cameron Fulton will outline how GPS data capture using a Trimble GeoXT, and subsequent GIS data manipulation using ESRI’s ArcMap, allowed Valhalla Trails Ltd (VTL) to inspect, spatially delineate, and photo document all technical trail features (TTFs), and trail centrelines, within the Iron Mountain Recreation Polygon (IRMP). VTL will present findings and outline how the use of GPS/GIS allowed us to help the land owner approach the cycling community and begin to regulate the expansion of the trail network within the IRMP. Attendees of this presentation will learn how geospatial analyses using GIS can be used to determine which trails were located on private property; how it can be used to quantify the trail expansion; how to attach photos to spatial locations; and how to KML files can be used to document and market a trail network. Also, attendees will be introduced to the process of employing data dictionaries for TTF inspections in relation to the Whistler Trail Standards.

Speakers:  Cameron Fulton, Valhalla Trails & Don Hays, Don Hays Trail Contractor
Cameron Fulton is a geographer with a background in forestry, geomatics (GIS and remote sensing), land surveying and commercial construction contracting. He is one of the principals at Valhalla Trails Ltd and has worked all over the Western Provinces and States. He has enjoyed a wide range of projects including: the GPS data capture and GIS manipulation for wildlife habitat modelling in South-Central B.C.; a precision-alignment of Fermilab’s particle accelerator; the layout and design of 80km of trails on the Westside of Prince Albert National Park; and recently the design and construction of a test car race track.

 

The Right Trail Tool for the Right Job
The most appropriate and efficient trailbuilding tool will depend on a variety of environmental factors, including soil composition, presence of rock or organic material, and vegetation. This panel of experienced builders will discuss a range of hand and mechanized equipment options for different regional conditions and trail products.

Speakers:  Panel of Professional Trail Contractors with decades of experience

 

Wednesday February 13       2:15-3:30 pm

Archeological Finds and Trail Building
(View Presentation - Archaeological Finds and Trail Building.pdf )

This session deals with the requirements for site inspection and reporting finds on projects that receive Federal funding. It will address the role the SHPO [State Historic Preservation Office] play in this process. The session will include the impact of a major archeological find during the course of a master planning survey for a trail system at Stonewall State Park and Resort in West Virginia. Included will be pictures and surveys of 100s of Native American stone structures in 13 complexes scattered over 2000 acres of the park. The discussion will track the reaction to this find, from initial dismay on the part of the developer, to the final acceptance of the possibility of using the find to increase the use of the park and resort. The scope of the find and the immensity of the effort to build these structures staggers the imagination. It is well worth attending this session to see the pictures alone.

Speaker:  Charles Dundas, Tri-state Company
“Charlie” began building trail, as a volunteer in 1958, while a Boy Scout. His company, Tri-State Company, has been building trail, professionally, since 1987. Tri-State’s market niche is remote site construction, often employing helicopter support. In the course of 24 years, they have built, designed, reconstructed or maintained over 500 miles of trail. They are, perhaps, better known as the “bridge people”, having built numerous bridges to include: cable suspension, glu-lam, steel, heavy timber, and their specialty, unique curvilinear screw laminated bridges/elevated walkways. Charlie views his company as more than a trail building company, he sees it as engaged in the art of “recreational infrastructure”.

 

Social Media and other Cutting Edge Trail Technology for Trails
Hilrideʼs Principal Designer, Nat Lopes, and Project Manager, Rachael Lopes will discuss the opportunities and benefits of using social media to manage projects, engage users and retain volunteers. Drawing on specific case studies, this presentation will outline various social media techniques that can engage communities to experience and understand their parks better and more safely, provide feedback during park and trail design and planning phases, attend public meetings and volunteer. Social media can also be used to disseminate important park, trail and project information or help to fundraise and collect donations. Attendees will learn concepts that they can apply to park planning and management in their community.

Speakers: Nat and Rachael Lopes, HILRIDE Progression Development Group
Members of PTBA since 2007 and serve as Principal Designer and Project Manager for Hilride Progression Development Group specializing in bike park design and trail master planning, tourism development and marketing media production. They have traveled extensively working, riding and filming in more than 900 locations across 50 United States, 9 Canadian provinces and 15 different countries around the world. Working as a team, they have consulted with clients ranging from Croatiaʼs Region of Istria Department of Tourism to the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources.

 

Preserved Wood for Sustainable Trail and Bridge Construction
The session addresses the use of preserved and fire retardant treated wood for maintenance and construction of trails, bridges and parks. Probably more than any other building product, wood and timber products complement and enhance a park project’s compatibility with nature. Wood complements nature because it is natural and blends in with the environment. Wood is probably the most sustainable and renewable building product and preserving it extends the life of the project even longer. And, in 2013, there are many new preservative choices on the market to protect wood against hazards such as insects, fungal decay and even fire.

Speaker: Jerry Parks, Western Wood Preservers Institute
Mr. Parks has served as Director of Marketing Services for the Western Wood Preservers Institute since 1994, acting as the association’s spokesman before regional, national and international media and the public. As the Institute’s chief communications professional, he has authored and edited numerous WWPI publications and reports. He regularly addresses various building trade forums to assure the recommended and proper use of treated wood for architects, structural engineers, building code officials, park professionals and maintenance contractors. Mr. Parks holds a bachelor’s degree in business from Portland State University and prior to his involvement with WWPI, was associated with one of the largest marketing communications firms in the Pacific Northwest.

 

Helical Anchors and Trailbuilding in Wet Environments
Why Helical Piers? We will explore the process for determining if helical piers can be used, effects on permitting, layout of a boardwalk using helical piers, and installation procedures. Framing, decking, railings, and observation platforms will also be discussed. This session is rated for all levels.

Speaker(s): Peter Jensen
Peter Jensen is the principal of Peter S. Jensen and Associates, LLC based out of Great Barrington, Massachusetts. He is a nationally recognized expert in the accessible trails industry. He served on the Regulatory Negotiation Committee of the US Access Board, and has been integral in the development of proposed Accessibility Guidelines for Trails and Outdoor Developed Areas. He is also a skilled instructor in the design, construction, planning and maintenance of natural surface trails that are both sustainable and as inherently accessible as an environment will allow.

Erin Amadon, Peter S. Jensen & Associates LLC
Erin’s experiences with trail work began at a young age as a Vermont Youth Conservation Corps member in 1997. Since then she has been involved with various trail organizations and clubs in the northeast, most recently working with SCA as a work skills instructor/lead instructor. Erin brings 15 years of trail work knowledge and experience to volunteer groups, clients, and fellow trail lovers. As a founding member of Peter S. Jensen and Associates LLC, Erin generally stays busy working on technical trail projects, teaching trail skills and working in her organic garden (when she finds time off).

Wednesday February 13       4:30-5:45 pm

Nature Deficit Disorder
(View Presentation - Nature Deficit Disorder.pdf )

Although not a recognized medical diagnosis, Nature Deficit Disorder is a useful summary term to describe the pattern of effects observed in children (and adults) who spend the majority of their time indoors with primarily electronic stimulation as their main mode of interaction with the world at large. This presentation will cover the works of Richard Louv, author of “Last Child in the Woods” and “The Nature Principle”, and offer some suggestions for how trails and greater access to natural environments can help to improve public health.

Speaker:  Susan Stormer, S&S Trails
Dr. Susan Stormer completed her training in clinical psychology at the University of South Florida in 1998 with a focus on behavioral medicine, which evaluates the interaction of psychological principles with physical health behaviors. A life-long equestrian and hiker, Susan began mountain biking in 1995 and started working on trails as a volunteer very soon after that. She became a professional consultant and trail educator in 2003, and is now self-employed as a trail contractor based out of Austin, Texas.

Trail Grants – How to Make Sure You’re “In the Money”
So you have plans for a great new project or improvements to an existing facility. Now the challenge ahead is securing the financing for accomplishing the project. This session will review public and private grant opportunities and focus on preparing a successful grant application package.

Speaker:  Terry & Ken Eastin, Eastin Outdoors
Terry and Ken are now going on 38 years of experience together. Terry has managed Eastin Outdoors since 1986 and has worked tirelessly to bring attention to the benefits of trails. Terry has raised well over $4,000,000 in grant funding for
community trail development and was instrumental in establishing Arkansas’ first Watchable Wildlife Trail Grant program. She serves as Executive Director of the ~3,000 mile-long Mississippi River Trail and has helped establish the Mississippi River Conservation Coalition, a collaborative effort between the National Park Service, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and other
federal, state, regional and local agencies along the River. Terry has won numerous awards related to trail advocacy including the coveted Kodak American Greenways Award presented by the National Geographic Society, Eastman-Kodak, and the
Conservation Fund.

Ken is a Landscape Architect and has served on the Professional Trailbuilders Association’s Board of Directors. Ken served as Landscape Architect and State Trails Coordinator for the Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism, where he took the
lead on the acquisition of a 75-mile railroad abandonment along the Mississippi River which is now being developed as the Delta Heritage Trail, also preparing the initial management plans for the facility.  Ken was also instrumental in helping to establish Arkansas’ Recreational Trails Grant Program and has worked within the Outdoor Recreation Grants program with
principle funding from the Land and Water Conservation Fund. Since 1998, Ken has been in private practice with Eastin Outdoors, Inc. His expertise is in public recreation management, with an emphasis on trail planning, design, construction
and management.

Department of Justice ADA Regulation on Mobility Devices and How It Applies
(View Presentation - OPDMDs.pdf )

What the recent Department of Justice Rule on the use of Other Power Driven Mobility Devices requires and how it applies to existing Federal, State, local, and privately owned trails and lands open to the public. The assessment factors and public notice requirements under that Rule will also be addressed. Discussion will be encouraged.

Speaker:  Janet Zeller, National Accessibility Program Director, USFS
Janet Zeller is the National Accessibility Program Manager for the U.S. Forest Service. She is responsible for the development and implementation of the accessibility programs and policies across the 193 million acres of the National Forest System. She also represents the Forest Service working on accessibility issues with partners, organizations, States, and other federal agencies including with the U.S. Access Board and the Department of Justice. Janet instructs accessibility and universal design of programs and facilities at a wide range of training sessions nationally. Email= jzeller@fs.fed.us

 

Rigging for Trail Work – Working Smarter, Not Harder
(View Presentation -Rigging for Trail Work.pdf )

While initially these rigging techniques were utilized by trail crews in Maine, they have assisted or been adopted by trail crews throughout the United States. This presentation will explore rigging equipment and it’s many applications in trail building. Via slides and narration, information regarding the safe use of rigging will be presented. Griphoist winches and specialty tools with be described. Applications from simple pulling/dragging situations to overhead systems hundreds of feet long will be illustrated.

Speaker: Lester Kenway, Trail Services LLC
Lester Kenway, Trail Services LLC, has been working with wire rope and rigging equipment for 32 years. Since 1993, he has supplied equipment, advice and instruction in the safe use of rigging tools throughout the United States via his company, Trail Services LLC based in Bangor, Maine. Lester has been involved in trails since 1971 through positions with the State of Maine, as an Appalachian Trail Volunteer, and as an independent contractor. He served as the Trail Supervisor at Baxter State Park for 22 years.

Thursday February 14       9:00-10:15 am

Bridge Building 101
(View Presentation - BRIDGES101.pdf )
Introduction to the basic types of trail and pedestrian bridges by Tri-State Company, Inc. Includes discussion of the basic considerations of bridge design. Discussion of site selection, the “physics of bridge functioning”, dead load, live load, and moment of load. The presentation includes photos, drawings, and animations. This presentation was one of the highlights of the 2010 West Virginia State Trails Conference.

Speaker(s): Charles Dundas, Tri-State Company
“Charlie” began building trail, as a volunteer in 1958, while a Boy Scout. His company, Tri-State Company, has been building trail, professionally, since 1987. Tri-State’s market niche is remote site construction, often employing helicopter support. In the course of 24 years, they have built, designed, reconstructed or maintained over 500 miles of trail. They are, perhaps, better known as the “bridge people”, having built numerous bridges to include: cable suspension, glu-lam, steel, heavy timber, and their specialty, unique curvilinear screw laminated bridges/elevated walkways. Charlie views his company as more than a trail building company, he sees it as engaged in the art of “recreational infrastructure”.

Risk Management for Trails and Bike Parks
Unfortunately, trail related lawsuits are on the rise. This session is an introduction to risk management to trails and will help attendees gain a better understanding of liability. Basic risk management strategy will be shared, and we will also use the audience as “jurors” in looking at photos of trail issues. Real case histories will help to shed some light on what types of lawsuits are happening and what the outcome of these cases.

Speaker:  Woody Keen, Trail Wisdom LLC
Woody Keen is President of Trail Wisdom LLC and has served as President of Professional TrailBuilders Association since 2006. Woody is well known for “big picture” planning work and he has authored numerous trail management plans for a wide range of different land managing agencies.

 

Trail Accessibility Guidelines for Trail Construction
(View Presentation - TrailAcesssGuidelines.pdf )

Still have questions about the trail accessibility guidelines and how they are to be applied? This session provides an opportunity for further discussion on this topic with Janet Zeller and Peter Jensen, Trail Planner/Builder.

Speakers:  Janet Zeller, National Accessibility Program Director, USFS
Janet Zeller is the National Accessibility Program Manager for the U.S. Forest Service. She is responsible for the development and implementation of the accessibility programs and policies across the 193 million acres of the National Forest System. She also represents the Forest Service working on accessibility issues with partners, organizations, States, and other federal agencies including with the U.S. Access Board and the Department of Justice. Janet instructs accessibility and universal design of programs and facilities at a wide range of training sessions nationally. Email= jzeller@fs.fed.us

Peter Jensen, Peter S. Jensen and Associates
Peter Jensen is the principal of Peter S. Jensen and Associates, LLC based out of Great Barrington, Massachusetts. He is a nationally recognized expert in the accessible trails industry. He served on the Regulatory Negotiation Committee of the US Access Board, and has been integral in the development of proposed Accessibility Guidelines for Trails and Outdoor Developed Areas. He is also a skilled instructor in the design, construction, planning and maintenance of natural surface trails that are both sustainable and as inherently accessible as an environment will allow.

 

Trail Systems and Community Development
(View Presentation From Gallup, NM - GallupNM.pdf )
(View Presentation from Park City, UT - PCStory.pdf )

Scores of academic, trade, and other studies have documented that trails are one of, if not the, most preferred amenity for homeowners, homebuyers, and members of a community. This presentation will provide a review of two community case studies, Park City, UT and Gallup, NM, that highlight the economic impacts on local and regional economies, property values, outdoor/trail-based activity centers, and the indirect impacts not directly associated with the trail system itself. The presentation will also highlight the types of trails (including the overall planning, design, and construction) that maximize these economic benefits for communities and direct financial returns for landowners, from small private property owners to large-scale resorts and planned real estate developments.

Speakers:  Troy Duffin, Park City, UT and Douglas Decker, Gallup, NM
Troy Duffin has been building exceptional trails for 17 years. With almost 400 miles completed, he is credited with some of the most enjoyable, iconic trails in the nation, including two which have been used for IMBA “Epic” rides. In addition to construction, he has worked extensively on planning, design, and maintenance projects. He has vast experience not only in the private sector, but also in the non-profit sector, and as an agency trails manager. He has spoken at dozens of regional and national conferences on a wide range of topics, and has received numerous industry awards.

Mr. Decker graduated from Brigham Young University in 1984 with a B.S. Degree; and graduated from UNM Law School in 1990 with a J.D. Degree. He became a member of the New Mexico Bar in 1990 and a member of the Arizona Bar in 1991. In October 1995, he filled the general in house Attorney position for McKinley County New Mexico. In addition to the legal service participation, Mr. Decker is part of adventure activity; tourism; and, economic development efforts within McKinley County. He was involved early on with the formation of Adventure Gallup & Beyond (AGB), a non-profit organization promoting adventure tourism in Gallup, McKinley County, and the Northwest New Mexico Region; has served a two year term as President of AGB; and, is still on the AG&B Board. Mr. Decker serves as the County designee and participant to the Zuni Mountain Trails Partnership, an association of organizations and individuals promoting the use, development and expansion of hiking and biking trails in the Zuni Mountain area of the Cibola National Forest, Mt. Taylor Ranger District.

 

Thursday February 14       10:45 am-12:00 pm

Wicked Steep Trail Work of the White Mountains
(View Presentation -Wicked_Steep_Trails.pdf )
The White Mountains of New Hampshire has over 1200 miles of hiking trails in an area of only 800,000 acres. Trail building in the Whites dates back over a century when it was popular to cut paths in the most direct route to the destination. Increased use coupled with steep terrain has caused extensive erosion over the years. Solutions have evolved within the past 40-50 years into intense rock work and creative ways to navigate slabs with wooden structures. Learn about these solutions and some of the newer challenges the Whites face.

Speaker: Cristin Bailey, Trail Manager, White Mountain NF
Cristin has been working on trails in the White Mountains since 1997. She obtained her Bachelors of Science in Outdoor Recreation Leadership at Unity College in 1999. She became the Appalachian Mountain Club’s Trails Supervisor in the fall of 2001 until 2006 when she accepted her current position as a Forestry Technician-Trails Manager for the White Mountain National Forest’s Saco Ranger District in Conway, NH.

Job Hazard Analyses and Crew Safety
The most important detail for any trail project planning and execution is the contractor and crew preparation, safety and well-being. At Penn Trails, we take the approach that it is important to have guidelines for each project, as well as, develop situational awareness. The presentation on Trail Project Hazard Analysis & Trail Crew Safety will discuss what a job hazard analysis is, offer guidelines to help you conduct a step-by-step analysis for a project and include the following items:

• Factors Affecting Risk
• Job Hazard Analysis process
• Crew Member Safety & Situational Awareness
• Emergency Response Planning
• First Aid Training & Job Safety Training

Speaker: Larry Knutson, Penn Trails
Larry Knutson, who brings a range of professional experience in backcountry trails work and recreation together wtih non-profit organizational development, adult and youth educational programs (including special populations), and leadership training. A life long backpacker, recipient of an American Hiking Society’s 2003 Volunteer of the Year award in Pennsylvania, former Appalachian Trail section overseer and Pennsylvania Park Ranger, he continues to build on his 30+ years enjoyment of backcountry trails in the United States, Europe, Central America, and Australia. His orientation and skills related to both trail technology, as well as, trail programing, has been acquired through active field experience, professional education, and certification by his peers.

GPS/GIS in Trailbuilding
Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are tools and technologies that enable efficient capture, analysis and display of geographic data. These tools are constantly evolving as new technology and data sets become available. This presentation focuses on using these systems in trail assessment and planning operations. A brief introduction to the current range of tools, software, and techniques for using them is followed by the presentation of several case studies which highlight the use of GPS and GIS tools on trail assessment and planning projects. The presentation concludes with discussion of the appropriateness of the techniques, efficiencies and problems associated with each and a question and answer session.

Speaker: Jeremy Wimpey, Applied Trails Research LLC and Greg Mazu, Singletrack Trails
Jeremy Wimpey, PhD. is an outdoor enthusiast with over 12 years GIS and GPS experience. Jeremy’s unique background—a trail user, an academic, and a professional—help bring a holistic approach to solving recreation management challenges. A hiker, trail runner and mountain biker, Jeremy has spent thousands of hours on trails around the world and understands trail-user needs from the perspective of a trail user. His academic background, including a Doctorate in Geospatial Environmental Analysis from Virginia Tech, brings a background in science and research to each challenge and a facts-first approach to problem solving.

Greg is the president of Singletrack Trails with 10 years of experience and will provide support for public workshops, provide input for on site trail layout design, meet with local user groups and provide the main equipment and labor supervision for construction in addition to those provided by our team, volunteers and the City. Greg has proven success for creating trail destinations for all types of facilities across the county that create an enjoyable user experience from beginner riders out for a Sunday ride to advanced riders looking for challenging features such as drops and jumps. He will bring a philosophy to create fun, sustainable trails that prevent user conflicts to any project that includes Singletrack Trails.

Designing a Trail Worth Traveling To
On a very limited budget, a simple but well designed trail system may be the ingredient to set a community apart and attract visitors. Learn how to plan an initial trail layout. This will be combination lecture/hands on workshop about how to design a sustainable trail that will be attractive to users.

Speaker:  Randy Martin, Trailscape Inc.
Randy Martin brings an unusual blend of a marketing mind, an analysts discipline and a keen sense of trail flow from his bicycling and snow ski racing experience. Randy has a unique way of presenting even seriously flawed data in a compelling manner.

 

Thursday February 14       1:00-2:15 pm

Dealing with Rock in Trailbuilding
(View Presentation - DEALING WITH ROCK.pdf )
This session was first presented at the 2012 members meeting in Albuquerque. It was one of the highlights of that meeting. The presentation provides an overview of the geology of rock encountered in trail building in North America. Methods and techniques are discussed as possible solutions to dealing with the challenges of rock obstacles. Numerous examples of various solutions are presented in, before and after shots, as well as, videos of work underway on a variety of projects. This course will be the second of four as part of a focus on stone work during the last day of the conference.

Speaker(s): Charles Dundas, Tri-State Company
“Charlie” began building trail, as a volunteer in 1958, while a Boy Scout. His company, Tri-State Company, has been building trail, professionally, since 1987. Tri-State’s market niche is remote site construction, often employing helicopter support. In the course of 24 years, they have built, designed, reconstructed or maintained over 500 miles of trail. They are, perhaps, better known as the “bridge people”, having built numerous bridges to include: cable suspension, glu-lam, steel, heavy timber, and their specialty, unique curvilinear screw laminated bridges/elevated walkways. Charlie views his company as more than a trail building company, he sees it as engaged in the art of “recreational infrastructure”.

Trail Grants – How to Make Sure You’re “In the Money”
So you have plans for a great new project or improvements to an existing facility. Now the challenge ahead is securing the financing for accomplishing the project. This session will review public and private grant opportunities and focus on preparing a successful grant application package.

Speaker:  Terry & Ken Eastin, Eastin Outdoors
Terry and Ken are now going on 38 years of experience together. Terry has managed Eastin Outdoors since 1986 and has worked tirelessly to bring attention to the benefits of trails. Terry has raised well over $4,000,000 in grant funding for
community trail development and was instrumental in establishing Arkansas’ first Watchable Wildlife Trail Grant program. She serves as Executive Director of the ~3,000 mile-long Mississippi River Trail and has helped establish the Mississippi River Conservation Coalition, a collaborative effort between the National Park Service, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and other
federal, state, regional and local agencies along the River. Terry has won numerous awards related to trail advocacy including the coveted Kodak American Greenways Award presented by the National Geographic Society, Eastman-Kodak, and the
Conservation Fund.

Ken is a Landscape Architect and has served on the Professional Trailbuilders Association’s Board of Directors. Ken served as Landscape Architect and State Trails Coordinator for the Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism, where he took the
lead on the acquisition of a 75-mile railroad abandonment along the Mississippi River which is now being developed as the Delta Heritage Trail, also preparing the initial management plans for the facility.  Ken was also instrumental in helping to establish Arkansas’ Recreational Trails Grant Program and has worked within the Outdoor Recreation Grants program with
principle funding from the Land and Water Conservation Fund. Since 1998, Ken has been in private practice with Eastin Outdoors, Inc. His expertise is in public recreation management, with an emphasis on trail planning, design, construction
and management.

Helical Anchors and Trailbuilding in Wet Environments
Why Helical Piers? We will explore the process for determining if helical piers can be used, effects on permitting, layout of a boardwalk using helical piers, and installation procedures. Framing, decking, railings, and observation platforms will also be discussed. This session is rated for all levels.

Speaker(s): Peter Jensen
Peter Jensen is the principal of Peter S. Jensen and Associates, LLC based out of Great Barrington, Massachusetts. He is a nationally recognized expert in the accessible trails industry. He served on the Regulatory Negotiation Committee of the US Access Board, and has been integral in the development of proposed Accessibility Guidelines for Trails and Outdoor Developed Areas. He is also a skilled instructor in the design, construction, planning and maintenance of natural surface trails that are both sustainable and as inherently accessible as an environment will allow.

Erin Amadon, Peter S. Jensen & Associates LLC
Erin’s experiences with trail work began at a young age as a Vermont Youth Conservation Corps member in 1997. Since then she has been involved with various trail organizations and clubs in the northeast, most recently working with SCA as a work skills instructor/lead instructor. Erin brings 15 years of trail work knowledge and experience to volunteer groups, clients, and fellow trail lovers. As a founding member of Peter S. Jensen and Associates LLC, Erin generally stays busy working on technical trail projects, teaching trail skills and working in her organic garden (when she finds time off).

 

The Right Trail Tool for the Right Job
The most appropriate and efficient trailbuilding tool will depend on a variety of environmental factors, including soil composition, presence of rock or organic material, and vegetation. This panel of experienced builders will discuss a range of hand and mechanized equipment options for different regional conditions and trail products.

Speakers:  Panel of Professional Trail Contractors with decades of experience

 

Thursday February 14       2:30-3:45 pm

Rigging for Trail Work – Working Smarter, Not Harder
(View Presentation -Rigging for Trail Work.pdf )

While initially these rigging techniques were utilized by trail crews in Maine, they have assisted or been adopted by trail crews throughout the United States. This presentation will explore rigging equipment and it’s many applications in trail building. Via slides and narration, information regarding the safe use of rigging will be presented. Griphoist winches and specialty tools with be described. Applications from simple pulling/dragging situations to overhead systems hundreds of feet long will be illustrated.

Speaker: Lester Kenway, Trail Services LLC
Lester Kenway, Trail Services LLC, has been working with wire rope and rigging equipment for 32 years. Since 1993, he has supplied equipment, advice and instruction in the safe use of rigging tools throughout the United States via his company, Trail Services LLC based in Bangor, Maine. Lester has been involved in trails since 1971 through positions with the State of Maine, as an Appalachian Trail Volunteer, and as an independent contractor. He served as the Trail Supervisor at Baxter State Park for 22 years.

 

Physical & Mental Health Benefits of Trails
(View Presentation - More Trails Better US.pdf )

This session will focus on the mental and physical health benefits of trails, not only to the individual but to the community and society as a whole. A summary of the research literature on mental health benefits of exercise and exposure to nature will be provided, along with anecdotes from the presenter’s personal life and clinical case history experiences.

Speaker:  Susan Stormer, S&S Trails
Dr. Susan Stormer completed her training in clinical psychology at the University of South Florida in 1998 with a focus on behavioral medicine, which evaluates the interaction of psychological principles with physical health behaviors. A life-long equestrian and hiker, Susan began mountain biking in 1995 and started working on trails as a volunteer very soon after that. She became a professional consultant and trail educator in 2003, and is now self-employed as a trail contractor based out of Austin, Texas.

 

Trails in Tribal Communities: Pueblo of Laguna
In the Spring of 2011 the Pueblo of Laguna, a federally recognized Native American Tribe in New Mexico, began a planning process to develop non-motorized routes to link the six villages within the Pueblo. This presentation will walk participants through the process of developing a trails plan for this unique community using photos, diagrams, and graphics created during planning and design. Specific aspects will include; the need for trails within the Pueblo, effective public involvement for this community, inventory of existing conditions, desired types of trails, trail amenities, wayfinding, and project phasing. Speakers will include members of the consulting team, the Tribal Planner and members of the Laguna Tribe.

Speaker:  Mike Rose, Alta Planning and Design
Michael Rose, PLA is an Associate with Alta Planning + Design and a Professional Landscape Architect in the state of Oregon (#627). He has been working in transportation planning and design for over 15 years. He has experience with a broad range of planning, design, and engineering projects including parks, natural surface trails, rails-with-trails, and regional trails. He also teaches bicycle and pedestrian planning at Portland State University.

 

Modern Geotechnical Solutions for Trails
Professional Trailbuilders are often called on to create sustainable trails through challenging terrain. Traditional methods and practices often have limitations in these environments. Modern Geotechnical engineering and design has developed a number of interesting and effective designs, systems and solutions for difficult soils with poor load bearing capacity and or anchoring such as wetlands. In other areas the broader geotecnical industry has also developed solutions for anchoring to steep slopes, retaining walls and fill retention. Trailbuilders have adapted some of these solutions to challenging remote environments.

Speaker:  Gerry Wilbour, Northwest Trails

 

Thursday February 14       3:45-5:00 pm

Stone Structures for Trails  (STONEWORK SERIES #4)
This session will focus on the various stone structures which can be used in trail construction from steps, to drainage, to retaining. This session is rated for the beginner/intermediate level. Several experts will discuss the appropriate use for each structure and the type of materials suited for the installation.

Speaker(s): Eddie Walsh, Tahawus Trails and Erin Amadon, Peter S Jensen and Associates

Erin Amadon, Peter S. Jensen & Associates LLC
Erin’s experiences with trail work began at a young age as a Vermont Youth Conservation Corps member in 1997. Since then she has been involved with various trail organizations and clubs in the northeast, most recently working with SCA as a work skills instructor/lead instructor. Erin brings 15 years of trail work knowledge and experience to volunteer groups, clients, and fellow trail lovers. As a founding member of Peter S. Jensen and Associates LLC, Erin generally stays busy working on technical trail projects, teaching trail skills and working in her organic garden (when she finds time off).

Social Media and other Cutting Edge Trail Technology for Trails
Hilrideʼs Principal Designer, Nat Lopes, and Project Manager, Rachael Lopes will discuss the opportunities and benefits of using social media to manage projects, engage users and retain volunteers. Drawing on specific case studies, this presentation will outline various social media techniques that can engage communities to experience and understand their parks better and more safely, provide feedback during park and trail design and planning phases, attend public meetings and volunteer. Social media can also be used to disseminate important park, trail and project information or help to fundraise and collect donations. Attendees will learn concepts that they can apply to park planning and management in their community.

Speakers: Nat and Rachael Lopes, HILRIDE Progression Development Group
Members of PTBA since 2007 and serve as Principal Designer and Project Manager for Hilride Progression Development Group specializing in bike park design and trail master planning, tourism development and marketing media production. They have traveled extensively working, riding and filming in more than 900 locations across 50 United States, 9 Canadian provinces and 15 different countries around the world. Working as a team, they have consulted with clients ranging from Croatiaʼs Region of Istria Department of Tourism to the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources.

 

New Forest Service Standard Trail Plans

The new Standard Trail Plans and Specifications replace the old Standard Drawings for Construction and Maintenance of Trails, 1996 (EM-7720-104) and Standard Specifications for Construction and Maintenance of Trails, 1996 (EM-7720-103). The standard trail plans were developed to assist with the assembly of trail construction trail plan packages.

The New Standard Trail Plans and Specifications include the following:
- Standard Plans for Trails and Trail Bridges
- Standard Specifications for Construction of Trails and Trail Bridges on Federal Projects
- Standard Pay Items

Speaker: Scott Groenier, USFS
James Scott Groenier, began working for MTDC in November 2003 as a civil engineering project leader for structures.  He earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin at Madison and a master’s degree from Montana State University. He has worked on trails, trail bridges and other recreation projects for over 30 years working for the Youth Conservation Corps and the USDA Forest Service.

 

The Trail as a Leadership Training Tool
How can the art of constructing a trail be utilized to provide leadership training to the managers of tomorrow? In partnership with the BLM in southern Utah, the American Conservation Experience has spent five years constructing and maintaining mountain bike trails outside of St George, Utah. This project has provided opportunities for crew leaders to learn and apply leadership skills, skills that these individuals have taken forward into managerial positions with state, federal and non-profit organizations across the United States, and the world.

Speaker:  Jordan Rolfe, Field Operations Manager, ACE Arizona